Haurata About Us

About Us


Warwick Tombleson has been farming Aerial Station since 1973 and we married in 1982. Haurata was bought and split between Michael and Jackie Wallbank and ourselves in 2007. Warwick being a keen horseman does most of the farm work on horse back rather than motorbikes. For the last 10 years I have kept busy as an architectural designer working from home. We have three children whom have all left home.

 

BIO FARMING
Haurata/Aerial Stn has been biologically farmed since 2007. Biologically farming basically is about the soil and not the grass on the top. By using minerals, trace elements, fish oil, seaweed and fungi instead of chemical fertilizer to feed and improve the soil. We use both conventional and organic means to sustainability without reducing production. The idea is to have the land rich in carbon, deep root systems along with healthier animals. Biologics don't have certifications like organics and they carry no labels and have no premiums for stock.

 

HAURATA ECO LAMB
Eco-op Lamb packages direct from our biological family farm to your plate.
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HISTORY
Haurata (Original name) was owned by the Craill’s then the Currie’s then the Steggall’s, who changed the name of the farm to Nardoo. The original house on the farm burnt down in 1986. A new House was built in 1987 and was bought by the Maclean family. They moved on in 1998 and sold the farm to Shakahn and Jaguar Kukulcan who then changed that name to Mahutai. We leased the bottom half of their farm for stock. Peter Ferreira, a German biophysicist, bought Mahutai in 2005, and renamed the place Agape Holistic Retreat, he seldom visited the place in the two years of owning it, so sold to the Tomblesons and Wallbanks in 2007. Tomblesons decided to change their block back to its original name (Haurata).

The shears quarters and woolshed have not been used since 1998 therefore are rundown along with a lot of the fences on the property. Sam and Jill Charteris own Hillview Station with some of the QE11 bush which the red walk takes you to. The homestead looks out to Ngatapa Mountain. They are happy for people to walk on their property to the pa site, where the Ringatu church leader Te Kooti had his last stand against the English Constabulary and Ropata before he escaped over the cliffs and into Urewera’s in 1869.

Te Kooti's followers had again been in a starving condition during the siege and many were to weak to avoid their pursuers. Ropata, left with a free hand, adopted stern measures. The captured were brought before him for questioning. Of these, over a hundred were placed in batches on the edge of a cliff and shot. Their bones are said to lie at the bottom to this day.
E
xtract from W Hugh Ross’s book “ Te Kooti”

Jane and Warwick Tombleson